chicagopubliclibrary
chicagopubliclibrary:

Harvard Discovers Three Of Its Library Books Are Bound In Human Flesh
From Roadtrippers:

A few years ago, three separate books were discovered in Harvard University’s library that had particularly strange-looking leather covers. Upon further inspection, it was discovered that the smooth binding was actually human flesh… in one case, skin harvested from a man who was flayed alive.
As it turns out, the practice of using human skin to bind books was actually pretty popular during the 17th century. It’s referred to as Anthropodermic bibliopegy and proved pretty common when it came to anatomical textbooks. Medical professionals would often use the flesh of cadavers they’d dissected during their research.
One of the books includes an inscription in purple cursive:
"The bynding of this booke is all that remains of my dear friende Jonas Wright, who was flayed alive by the Wavuma on the Fourth Day of August, 1632. King Mbesa did give me the book, it being one of poore Jonas chiefe possessions, together with ample of his skin to bynd it. Requiescat in pace."

chicagopubliclibrary:

Harvard Discovers Three Of Its Library Books Are Bound In Human Flesh

From Roadtrippers:

A few years ago, three separate books were discovered in Harvard University’s library that had particularly strange-looking leather covers. Upon further inspection, it was discovered that the smooth binding was actually human flesh… in one case, skin harvested from a man who was flayed alive.

As it turns out, the practice of using human skin to bind books was actually pretty popular during the 17th century. It’s referred to as Anthropodermic bibliopegy and proved pretty common when it came to anatomical textbooks. Medical professionals would often use the flesh of cadavers they’d dissected during their research.

One of the books includes an inscription in purple cursive:

"The bynding of this booke is all that remains of my dear friende Jonas Wright, who was flayed alive by the Wavuma on the Fourth Day of August, 1632. King Mbesa did give me the book, it being one of poore Jonas chiefe possessions, together with ample of his skin to bynd it. Requiescat in pace."

fieldmuseumphotoarchives
fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Here is a plate from the Research Design in Nature series from 1929. We digitize prints and other materials from the library collection. 
© The Field Museum, GN90798d_RDN051.
Take the Illinois Central to Field Museum color poster of a Great Anteater with the Field Museum in the background. Take The Illinois Central to the Field Museum advertisement Vol2 PL 48 Plates from Research Design in Nature, a publication by Field Museum Press by John Gilbert Wilkins from the Art Institute of Chicago, circa 1925.
scanned print
1929 

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Here is a plate from the Research Design in Nature series from 1929. We digitize prints and other materials from the library collection.

© The Field Museum, GN90798d_RDN051.

Take the Illinois Central to Field Museum color poster of a Great Anteater with the Field Museum in the background. Take The Illinois Central to the Field Museum advertisement Vol2 PL 48 Plates from Research Design in Nature, a publication by Field Museum Press by John Gilbert Wilkins from the Art Institute of Chicago, circa 1925.

scanned print

1929 

Working in the vault sometimes turns into feeling like I’m piecing together the Dead Sea Scrolls.  No, this is neither as complex nor as important as the Dead Sea Scrolls - but I did have to pick up the various sized pieces after they happily dispersed as I pulled them from the shelves.  Then, I had to lay them all out as they had been originally before encapsulating them in mylar so the whole “we’re free!” thing doesn’t happen again and no more damage comes to this paper.

Working in the vault sometimes turns into feeling like I’m piecing together the Dead Sea Scrolls.  No, this is neither as complex nor as important as the Dead Sea Scrolls - but I did have to pick up the various sized pieces after they happily dispersed as I pulled them from the shelves.  Then, I had to lay them all out as they had been originally before encapsulating them in mylar so the whole “we’re free!” thing doesn’t happen again and no more damage comes to this paper.